“How can anyone be faithful to a concept that refuses to be one and fails in its refusal?”

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By Patrick Crowley, Paul Hegarty in Formless: Ways in and Out of Form, p185

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escaping definitions, just a note

“Their colour shines forth with a brilliance which seems to us praeternatural, because it is in fact entirely natural – entirely natural in the sense of being entirely unsophisticated by language or the scientific, philosophical and utilitarian notions, by means of which we ordinarily re-create the given world in our own drearily human image.”

Aldous Huxley

ISLANDS AND MOUNTAINS and the movement of difference

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a highly idiosyncratic selection of quotes” from current reading by Deleuze (found here)

“Geographers say there are two kinds of islands . . . . Continental islands are accidental, derived islands. They are separated from a continent . . . . Oceanic islands are originary, essential islands. Some are formed from coral reefs . . . others emerge from underwater eruptions . . . . These two islands, continental and originary, reveal a profound opposition between ocean and island” (9). “Dreaming of islands . . . is dreaming of pulling away, or being already separate, far from any continent, of being lost and alone——or it is dreaming of starting from scratch, recreating, beginning anew” (10). “Hence the fundamental list of the senses of the word planetary: global, itinerant, errancy, planning, platitude, gears and wheels” (75). “Who speaks and who acts? It’s always a multiplicity, even in the person that speaks or acts. We are all groupuscles . . . there is only the action . . . in the relations of relays and networks” (207). “If we look at today’s situation, power necessarily has a global or total vision” (210). “Imperial unity gave birth to philosophical discourse . . . . Philosophical discourse has always maintained an essential relation to the law, the institution, and the contract . . . traversing the ages of sedentary history from despotic formation to democracies” (259). “Whoever reads Nietzsche without laughing, and laughing heartily and often and sometimes hysterically, is almost not reading Nietzsche at all” (257). “An island doesn’t stop being deserted simply because it is inhabited” (10). “The simple is not divided, it differentiates itself. This is the essence of the simple, or the movement of difference” (39).